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First line :
Curt Wilcox's boy came around the barracks a lot the year after his father died, I mean a lot, but nobody ever told him get out the way or asked him what in hail he was doing there again.

Notes :
From a Buick 8
- is connected to the Dark Tower by way of Hearts in Atlantis. In the second to last short story in that book, "Sully" John Sullivan reminisces about the Vietnam War with Dieffenbacker from Buick 8. Those who read closely will note the use of "five by five" on the part of Dieffenbacker; this originated in Buick 8 as a codeword to explain that the Buick wasn't up to anything strange.

It is also theorized that the Buick is one of the same types of vehicles that the can-toin, or "Low Men" drive in "Low Men In Yellow Coats", also from Hearts in Atlantis.

We can guess from the title, King's book is at least in some way influenced by the Bob Dylan song, "From a Buick 6." I do not yet know the relevance.

Places :
Statler, Pennsylvania
Take a look at the towns for more info...

Quotes :
  • “Like beer, iced tea is something you can't buy, only rent.”
  • “Sometimes what you say with your mouth hardly matters at all.”
  • “I don’t know about the subconscious, but there’s a pulse in our heads, all right, same as there’s one in our chests, and it carries unformed, no-language thoughts that most times we can’t even read, and they are usually the important ones.”
  • “People can get used to just about anything. That’s the best of our lives, I guess. Of course, it’s the horror of them, too.
  • “Sometimes when things go wrong, we get more help than we ever expected. And sometimes it’s still not enough.”
  • “Curiosity killed the cat, satisfaction brought him back.”
  • “The mind is a powerful and often unreliable machine.”
  • “Heroism is the act of going forward in the face of fear.”
  • “There were some things you just didn’t want to see.”
  • “Sometimes one’s mind simply passes beyond one’s rational and logical control.”
  • “There are moments in a life that don’t matter and moments that do and some – maybe a dozen – when everything is on a hinge.”
  • “In my experience the bad shit gets saved up until you have a day when everything comes due at once.”
  • “It’s funny how close the past is, sometimes. Sometimes it seems as if you could almost reach out and touch it. Only… only who really wants to?”
  • “The world rarely finishes its conversations."


  • Similar books :
    Christine
    The Tommyknockers
    previous title: everything's eventual | rose red :next title
    PAGE MENU : description | inspiration | review | editions


    DESCRIPTION
  • Written : Bangor, Maine / Boston, Massachusetts / Naples, Florida / Lovell, Maine / Osprey, Florida, April 3, 1999 -- March 20, 2002
  • From a Buick 8 is set in Pennsylvania, just like Christine...
  • Stephen King, an evil car, and a teenage boy coming to terms with the fragility and randomness of life. Wait, haven't we read this before? Diehard King fans, worry not... Nothing like Christine.
  • Synopsis :
    Shortly after his father, a Pennsylvania state trooper, is killed in a senseless automobile accident, Ned Wilcox discovers that the members of Troop D have a secret concealed behind their headquarters. Curtis Wilcox's friends and colleagues take turns relating the twenty-year history of the mysterious Buick Roadmaster locked in Shed B and how its discovery and unexplained behavior has captivated the tightly knit group of men for two decades. The Buick seems to be a conduit to another reality and every now and then it breathes, inhaling a little bit of this world, exhaling a little bit of whatever world it came from.


  • INSPIRATION
    "My wife and I spent the winter of 1999 on Longboat Key in Florida, where I tinkered at the final draft of a short novel (The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon) and wrote little else of note. Nor did I have plans to write anything in the spring of that year. In late March, I drove back to Maine. My second or third day on the road found me in western Pennsylvania. I needed gas and got off the turnpike at a rural exit. Near the ramp I found a Conoco station. There was an actual attendant who actually pumped the gas. I left him doing his thing and went to the restroom to do mine. Here I found a rather steep slope littered with auto parts and a brawling stream at the foot. There was still a fair amount of snow on the ground, in dirty strips and runners. I walked a little way down the slope to get a better look at the water, and my feet went out from beneath me. I slid about ten feet before grabbing a rusty something-or-other and bringing myself to a stop. Had I missed it, I might well have gone into the water. I paid the attendant and got back on the highway. I mused about my slip as I drove, wondering about what would have happened if I'd gone into the stream (which, with all that spring runoff, was at least temporarily a small river). How long would my truckload of Florida furnishings and our bright Florida clothes have stood at the pumps before the gas-jockey got nervous? Whom would he have called? How long before they'd have found me if I had drowned? This little incident happened around ten in the morning. By afternoon I was in New York. And by then I had the story pretty much set in my mind."


    REVIEW
    Stephen King, an evil car, and a teenage boy coming to terms with the fragility and randomness of life.... Wait, haven't we read this before? Diehard King fans, worry not. Aside from the titular car playing a main role in the story, From a Buick 8 could not be less like King's 1983 masterpiece, Christine. If anything, this story resembles King's serial novel The Green Mile, with reminiscing police characters flashing back on bizarre events that took place decades earlier.

    The book's intriguing plot revolves around the troopers of Pennsylvania State Patrol Troop D, who come into possession of what at first appears to be a vintage automobile. Closer inspection and experimentation conducted by the troopers reveal that this car's doors (and trunk) sometimes open to another dimension populated by gross-out creatures straight out of ... well, a Stephen King novel. As the plot progresses, the veteran troopers' tales of these visits from interdimensional nasties, and the occasional "lightquakes" put on by the car, are passed on to the son of a fallen comrade whose fascination with the car bordered on dangerous obsession.

    Unlike earlier King works, there is no active threat here; no monster is stalking the heroes of the story, unless you count the characters' own curiosity. In past books, King has terrorized readers with vampires, werewolves, a killer clown, ghosts, and aliens, but this time around, the bogeyman is a more passive, cerebral threat, and one for which they don't make a ready-to-wear Halloween costume--man's fascination with and fear of the unknown. While some readers may find this tale less exciting than the horror master's earlier works, From a Buick 8 is a wonderful example of how much King's plotting skills and literary finesse have matured over his long career. And, most of all, it's a darn creepy book. --Benjamin Reese--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


    EDITIONS
    FIRST EDITION
    Scribner 2002.

    “1 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2” on copyright page.

    Dust Jacket price: $28.00

    LIMITED EDITION

    Published by Cemetery Dance, 2002.
    408 pages, © October 2002.

    Illustrated by Berni Wrightson.

    52 lettered copies.
    750 numbered, traycased, signed by King.
    1750 unsigned "gift" edition.

    MY EDITION

    Hodder & Stoughton 2002.
    Hardcover.

    "1 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2" on copyright page.
    404 pages.
    ISBN 0 340 77069 4.

    Copyright © 2002 by Stephen King.
    Cover illustration: Larry Rostant.
    Author photograph: © 2000 Jimmy Malecki.


    DEDICATION


    This is for Surendra and Geeta Patel.

    BOOK BREAKDOWN


    NOW:
    Sandy

    THEN

    NOW:
    Sandy

    THEN

    NOW:
    Sandy

    THEN

    NOW:
    Sandy

    THEN

    NOW:
    Arky

    THEN

    NOW:
    Sandy

    NOW:
    Phil

    NOW:
    Sandy

    THEN

    NOW:
    Sandy

    THEN

    NOW:
    Sandy

    THEN:
    Sandy

    THEN:
    Shirley

    THEN:
    Eddie

    THEN:
    Huddie

    THEN:
    Shirley

    THEN:
    Eddie

    NOW:
    Arky

    THEN:
    Eddie

    THEN:
    Shirley

    THEN:
    Eddie

    THEN:
    Huddie

    THEN:
    Eddie

    THEN:
    Shirley

    THEN:
    Eddie

    NOW:
    Shirley

    THEN:
    Eddie

    NOW:
    Sandy

    THEN:
    Curtis

    NOW:
    Sandy

    LATER

    AUTHOR'S NOTE

    INNER SLEEVE


    Come close, children, and see the living crocodile.
    A vintage '54 blue Buick Roadmaster. At least, that's what it looks like...

    There is a terrifying secret shrouded in Shed B out the back of the state police barracks in Statler, Pennsylvania. A secret which lures its victims, terrified yet irresistibly temped, to look at its beautiful chrome fender, silver grille and exotic exhaust system. None of which works. Because the power of the Buick 8 is not turbo-charged or fuel-injected.

    For twenty years, the Buick has lured curious officers to watch its terrifying display - from blinding light-shows to feeding time. Come take a look. Because the Buick is a conduit to a world beyond.

    Young Ned Wilcox will be next. Ned has started coming by the barracks: mowing the lawn, washing the windows, shovelling snow. It's the boy's way of holding on to his father - recently killed in a strange road accident by another Buick.

    And Ned can feel it pulling him, whispering for him to come in and take a look.

    ALSO KNOWN AS


    Om en Buick 8 (Denmark)
    Der Buick (Germany)
    Rémautó (Hungary)
    Buick 8 (Poland)
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